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You might have changed all your passwords in the days since you learned of the Heartbleed bug, but if you're one of millions of people using certain Android devices, you might still be vulnerable.
Numerous devices running older versions of Google’s Android operating system may be at risk of the high-profile bug, according to Marc Rogers, a security expert at the mobile security firm Lookout.
Rogers told The Huffington Post that people using Android version 4.1.1 should avoid sensitive transactions on their mobile devices because a hacker could exploit the Heartbleed bug to steal their data.
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The Heartbleed bug, a newly discovered security vulnerability that puts users' passwords at many popular Web sites at risk, has upended the Web since it was disclosed earlier this week. It's an extremely serious issue, and as such, there's a lot of confusion about the bug and its implications as you use the Internet.
TechProceed.com has compiled a list of Frequently Asked Questions to help users learn more about the bug andprotect themselves. The Heartbleed situation is ongoing, and we'll update this FAQ as new issues arise. Check back for new information.
What is Heartbleed?
Heartbleed is a security vulnerability in OpenSSL software that lets a hacker access the memory of data servers. According to Netcraft, an Internet research firm, 500,000 Web sites could be affected. That means a user's sensitive personal data -- including usernames, passwords, and credit card information -- is potentially at risk of being intercepted.
The vulnerability also means an attacker could steal a server's digital keys that are used to encrypt communications and get access to a company's secret internal documents.
What is OpenSSL?
Let's start with SSL. That stands for Secure Sockets Layer, but it's also known by its new name, Transport Layer Security, or TLS. It's the most basic means of encrypting information on the Web, and it mitigates the potential of someone eavesdropping on you as you browse the Internet. (Notice the "https" in the URL of SSL-enabled sites like Gmail, instead of simply "http.")
OpenSSL is open-source software for SSL implementation across the Web. The versions with the vulnerability are 1.0.1 through 1.0.1f. OpenSSL also is used as part of the Linux operating system, and as a component of Apache and Nginx, two very widely used programs for running Web sites. Bottom line: Its use across the Web is vast.
Who discovered the bug?
Credit is given to security firm Codenomicon and Google researcher Neel Mehta, who both found the bug independently from each other, but on the same day.
Mehta donated the $15,000 bounty he was awarded for helping find the bug to the Freedom of the Press Foundation's campaign for the development of encryption tools for journalists to use when communicating with sources. Mehta is declining press interviews, but asked for comment, Google said, "The security of our users' information is a top priority. We proactively look for vulnerabilities and encourage others to report them precisely so that we are able to fix them before they are exploited."
Why is it called Heartbleed?
According to Vocativ, the term "Heartbleed" was coined by Ossi Herrala, a systems administrator at Codenomicon. It's got a nicer ring to it than its technical name, CVE-2014-0160, named for the line of code that contained the bug.
Heartbleed is a play on words referring to an extension on OpenSSL called "heartbeat." The protocol is used to keep connections open, even when data isn't being shared between those connections. Herrala "thought it was fitting to call it Heartbleed because it was bleeding out the important information from the memory," David Chartier, chief executive of Codenomicon, told Vocativ.
If the name sounds a bit too catchy for a security glitch, that's exactly the point. The team at Codenomicon wanted something press friendly that could spread quickly, to warn more people of the flaw. Soon after they named the bug, they bought the domain Heartbleed.com to educate the Web about the glitch.
Why are some sites not affected by Heartbleed?
Although OpenSSL is very popular, there are other SSL/TLS options. In addition, some Web sites use an earlier, unaffected version, and some didn't enable the "heartbeat" feature that was central to the vulnerability.
While it doesn't solve the problem, what mitigates the scope of the potential damage is the implementation of perfect forward secrecy, or PFS, a practice that makes sure encryption keys have a very short shelf life, and are not used forever. That means that if an attacker did get an encryption key out of a server's memory, the attacker wouldn't be able to decode all secure traffic from that server because keys use is very limited. While some tech giants, like Google and Facebook, have started to support PFS, not every company does.
How does the bug work?
The vulnerability lets a hacker access up to 64 kilobytes of server memory, but perform the attack over and over again to get lots of information. That means an attacker could get not just usernames and passwords, but also "cookie" data that Web servers and browsers use to track individuals and ease log-in. According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, doing the attack repeatedly could yield more serious information, like a site's private SSL key, used to encrypt traffic. With that key, someone could run a fake version of a Web site and use it to steal all other kinds of information, like credit card numbers or private messages.
Should I change my passwords?
For many Web sites, yes. BUT wait until you get confirmation from the Web site operator that the bug has been patched. It's a natural reaction to want to change all of your passwords immediately, but if the Web site's bug has not been fixed yet, making the change could be useless -- you're just potentially giving an attacker your new password.
How do I check if a Web site has been affected -- or fixed?
A few companies and developers have created testing sites to check which Web sites are vulnerable or safe. Two good ones are by LastPass, a company that makes password management software, andQualys, a security firm. While these test sites are a good preliminary check, continue to proceed with caution, even if the site gives you an all-clear indication. If you're given a red flag, however, avoid the site.
CNET is keeping a running list on the status of the top 100 Web sites, according to Alexa.com. Check back here for updates. Here's a list of sites that were still vulnerable as of Thursday afternoon,according to researchers at Zmap.
But the most prudent thing to do is to get confirmation from the site through one of its official channels. Lots of companies have been putting up blog posts and issuing statements about the health of their sites. Or you can email a site operator or customer service person directly.
The programmer who wrote the glitchy code was Robin Seggelmann, who worked for the OpenSSL project while getting his Ph.D. studies from 2008 to 2012. Adding to the drama of the situation, he submitted the code at 11:59 p.m. on New Year's Eve 2011, though he claims the timing has nothing to do with the bug. "I am responsible for the error," Seggelmann said. "Because I wrote the code and missed the necessary validation by an oversight."
Who was behind the bug?
Still, as an open-source project, it's hard to place the blame squarely on one person. As Zulfikar Ramzan, chief technology officer of cloud security startup Elastica, explained to The New York Times, there's so much complex code that people had been writing, and the particular protocol Heartbeat did not get enough scrutiny. "Heartbeat is not the main part of SSL. It's just one additional feature within SSL," he said. "So it's conceivable that nobody looked at that code as carefully because it was not part of the main line."
Is it true that the US government exploited Heartbleed before the world knew about it?
That's unclear at this time. One report said that the National Security Agency knew about the exploit before it was called Heartbleed and exploited it to gather intelligence, but the NSA denied the accusation. Whether the report is accurate, the fact remains that when left unpatched, Heartbleed is a major security risk.
Should I be worried about my bank account?
Most banks don't use OpenSSL, but instead use proprietary encryption software. But if you're unsure, contact your bank directly for confirmation that the Web site is secure. Still, John Miller, security research manager for security and compliance firm TrustWave, suggests keeping a close eye on financial statements for the next few days to make sure there are no unfamiliar charges.
How do I know if anyone has used the Heartbleed vulnerability to steal my information?
Unfortunately, exploiting the bug "leaves no traces of anything abnormal happening to the logs" of Web sites, according to Codenomicon.
What password managers can I try?
One thing the Heartbleed situation highlights is the value of a good password. In the aftermath of changing your old passwords, you might be wondering if there are other ways to make sure your accounts are secure. Password managers try to solve that problem by helping you generate random passwords for each account. You then control everything through one strong master password. Having all of your accounts under one manager may be too close for comfort for some users, but LastPass, one of those vendors, insists it's secure, and that users don't have to change their master passwords due to Heartbleed. It's even added a feature that automatically checks your saved sites for Heartbleed vulnerabilities. Other password manager options are RoboForm, Dashlane, and 1Password.
Another suggestion is enabling two-factor authentication when it is offered. (Gmail is one service that does so.) That means that in addition to a password, the service asks for another piece of identifying information, like a code that's been texted to you. That way, even if someone steals your password, it makes it harder for someone to falsely log in as you.

The all new HTC One will be unveiled officially on March 25th, but three weeks before that date - Breaking a lot of the secrecy around HTC’s next big thing. Continue to read TechProceed.com's take on this:

Truth be told, there wasn’t all that much secrecy left, as leaked images had already surfaced from all places, revealing the more intense metal design of the new HTC One and its one key feature - a “Duo” camera on its back. There was some, though, as we had seen a lot of still images and a very short video, but nothing like a full-on video preview. Moreover, in the following days, more such short videos surfaced and we even saw a concise walkthrough of HTC's Sense 6.0 user interface.



So what can we say now, what will the new HTC One look like? Read on to find out our recap of all its new features, a look at the “Duo” camera and what it could offer, as well as specs and release date.

“Duo” camera - two cameras on its back

The all new HTC One will be the first phone to feature two cameras on its back. We have actually already seen smartphones with dual rear cameras, but their goal was 3D photography, while the cameras on HTC’s new big thing are said to contribute to improving traditional 2D photography rather than 3D.

The actual process of taking a photograph on the new HTC One actually looks pretty much unchanged - you see a single image through the viewfinder and you tap on a button to capture a picture. The actual benefits of the dual camera become visible once you open a captured image, as you can apply “Duo effects” to the picture. We’d also guess that HTC has bundled in effects like post-capture focusing, a depth map and the possibility to erase objects from an image, but we are yet to see a confirmation about these features. The other changes in the actual shooting process should be in faster focusing and a more pronounced depth of field effect. We have also seen demonstrations showing how the two rear cameras can be used to achieve lossless zoom, but we don’t know whether the camera in the new HTC One will have this feature on board.

The camera interface is also overhauled, and now you can select from six main shooting modes. The regular camera and video modes are what most consumers will use most of the time, but there is also a “Zoe camera”, “Selfie”, “Dual capture” (recording simultaneously on your front and rear cameras), and a “Pan 360” (360-degree panorama) mode.

HTC is also said to still use UltraPixel technology, but in an improved form. That's good news, as we have found the current UltraPixel camera on the HTC One to be sub-par to its peers.

Design: more intense metal

With so many leaked images, it seems clear that the new HTC One will feature a design very similar to the HTC One, with two front-facing speakers and an aluminum unibody, but with an even more intense metal finish, with more pronounced metallic texture.

The all new One should feature a slightly larger, 5-inch display with a resolution of 1080 x 1920 pixels. Rather than having capacitive navigation keys below the display, the new flagship will sport on-screen buttons. All in all, the new design looks just a bit larger (both wider and taller) than the 2013 HTC One.

All new interface: Sense 6.0

The new HTC One is expected to ship with the latest Android 4.4 KitKat on board and a re-imagined Sense user interface on top of that. The new Sense is expected to carry the 6.x version, but it is not a huge change over the current one. The most interesting new feature seems to be the added support for 'Motion Launch gestures' like double-tap to wake the phone's display.

The BlinkFeed news aggregator is still a swipe away (but it’s been improved), and now you can swipe twice to see its contents by category. The overall visuals have not changed much either - you still have a vertically scrolling app drawer, dark backgrounds and a similar aesthetic. The two biggest changes are in the camera app and the settings menu. The camera app now has large, round icons that are easy to tap on, and in settings the icons have also been simplified, getting that trendy, flat styling.

Specs

Under the hood, the new HTC One is expected to ship with a quad-core Snapdragon 801 system chip (likely, the MSM8974-AB version of it) with 2GB RAM. This is the same chip that powers devices like the Samsung Galaxy S5 and the Sony Xperia Z2, (the Z2 has slightly more RAM - 3GB) so it should be more or less on par with the top performers. We’re yet to see detailed benchmarks, but it is only logical to assume that the handset will run even the most demanding of games with ease.

The new and exciting thing under the hood is the added support for expandable storage. The new HTC One should come with a microSD card expansion slot (the current model does not support microSD cards), so you can expand the storage freely.

Official announcement set for March 25th, coming to all carriers

HTC has already set the date for the official unveiling of its next flagship - it’s March 25th, with events simultaneously taking place in New York City and London. The new HTC One has also cleared FCC certification recently, and we have all reasons to believe it will arrive on all four major US carriers - Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile - as well as internationally. With all this information, do you feel ready to break the piggy bank and grab HTC's upcoming new big thing?

This post is about Telegram for PC or Telegram Messenger for PC. Those who do not know Telegram is an Android, iOS and Windows app which is a messenger. We have seen WhatsApp taking the world by storm. WhatsApp rocked because it was simple and fast. Other alternatives of WhatsApp like Wechat, Line came and went but WhatsApp stood up against them. You can use WhatsApp for PC & WeChat for PC. Now, Telegram messenger is doing the same thing as WhatsApp. It is similar to WhatsApp and has some positive points. The best thing is that Telegram is available for PC, So you can easily download Telegram Messenger for PC (Windows). You can download following Android apps for PC.


There are many features of Telegram messenger and they are almost same as WhatsApp but There are some benefits of TeleGram over WhatsApp:
  • You can send messages with internet on Telegram.
  • You can send pictures with Telegram Messenger.
  • You can see when your friends were last online.
  • Benefits of Telegram over WhatsApp Messenger
  • A PC client is available so you can easily use Telegram on PC.
  • It is fast
  • It has encrypted secure chat feature
  • The verification process is easy.
How To Install Telegram on PC (Windows)

You can easily install Telegram messenger on PC by following the simple steps
  • Download Telegram for PC from this link: http://tdesktop.com/win/current
  • Install the .exe file on your Windows PC.
  • Open the installed Telegram Messenger application and Click on start messaging (Make sure you are connected to Internet).


  • On the next screen it will detect your country automatically and ask for your phone number. Register a new number or enter the old number if you already have a Telegram account as shown.
  • It will send you a pin on the phone number for verification.



  • Now , your account will be activated. Enter you details by going to settings and upload a profile picture and customize the options according to your choice.

You could send your queries/issues faced to Snehal [at] TechProceed [dot] com.

Congratulations, You have just Installed Telegram on PC (Windows). Share this article with your friends and let them know about this cool app. 



What do you do when you’re one of the world’s largest smartphone makers and it’s time to update your flagship device? If you’re Samsung, you trot out the new Galaxy S5, a refined and updated take on last year’s wildly successful Galaxy S4. Like the new Gear wearables, the Galaxy S5 looks and feels familiar, but offers a number of improvements over last year’s edition.

The Galaxy S5’s design is a minor evolution of the Galaxy S4 — in fact, the two are almost indistinguishable from the front. The S5’s display is ever so slightly larger at 5.1 inches, but it’s still a 1080p, Super AMOLED panel that doesn’t look very different from the S4’s screen. Below the display is a new home key with integrated fingerprint scanner and capacitive keys for multitasking and Android’s back button.

Samsung has retained the familiar metal-looking plastic surround on the S5, though the charging port (now USB 3.0) comes with an integrated port cover for waterproofing. The S5 is IP67-rated for water and dust resistance, meaning it can be submerged in 3 feet of water for up to 30 minutes at a time.

Though the S5 is extremely familiar-looking from the front, things take a turn around back, where Samsung has replaced the S4’s slimy, glossy plastic battery cover with a dimpled soft-touch finish. The company is calling this a "modern glam" look, though if you’re familiar with the original Nexus 7 released in 2012, it’s very similar to that. The new back offers a significant upgrade in they way the device feels — it’s much more comfortable to hold and doesn’t slide off of surfaces nearly as much as the S4 — but it doesn’t look as tacky as the fake-leather patterns used on Samsung’s Note line of devices. Samsung is offering the S5 in four different colors — black, white, blue, and gold — but the black and white are the most attractive options. The first complaint usually levied at Samsung’s Galaxy smartphones is their abundant use of glossy, cheap feeling plastic, but the S5’s new finish reverses this trend and is one of the most significant upgrades introduced this year.A FAMILIAR DESIGN, BUT WITH LESS GLOSSY PLASTIC

But despite the refined design and new patterned finish, the S5 is unmistakably a Samsung smartphone. The S5 is launching with Android 4.4.2 KitKat with Samsung’s user interface fully intact. Though earlier reports had said that Samsung intended to tone down its software due to pressure from Google, the S5 retains much of the signature pieces of the Galaxy line. There are S-branded apps in many places, including the S Voice personal assistant, and Samsung’s signature bloops and whistles are present every time you interact with the device. The My Magazine feature, Samsung’s Flipboard-like news reader that debuted on the Note 3, is accessible directly to the left of the home screen, but the main display is a very familiar assortment of folders, app shortcuts, and a weather widget. The most notable change is found in the settings menu, where Samsung has swapped out the tabbed interface for a single, vertical scrolling screen with round, flat icons.



Samsung is making a huge push into fitness tracking this year, and the Galaxy S5 benefits from a revamped S Health app and new heart-rate sensor on its back. The new S Health app can sync with Samsung’s Gear line of wearables, including the Gear Fit fitness band, and it offers guided coaching and feedback while you work out. Developers will be able to tap into the data offered by the service through an SDK that will be out later this year.

The heart rate monitor is a unique addition and is located just below the camera and reads your fingertip to grab your pulse in about five to ten seconds. In our brief tests, the sensor worked as advertised and was able to give me a reading in just a few seconds.
HEART-RATE MONITORS AND FINGERPRINT SCANNERS

Less successful is Samsung’s take on the fingerprint-unlock system made popular by Apple with the iPhone 5S. Like the 5S, the S5’s home key features an integrated fingerprint scanner, which can be used to unlock the phone or authenticate purchases online (Samsung is partnering with PayPal to enable this feature, though it doesn’t validate purchases from the Google Play Store). Samsung’s version requires a vertical swipe over the home button to activate the scanner, and we found it to be quite unreliable and virtually impossible to activate when holding the phone in one hand. It can store up to three different digits, but it was very particular about the speed and orientation of the swiping motion used — if we weren’t doing a perfectly straight swipe down, it would refuse to unlock the phone.

Samsung didn’t ignore the other vital components of the S5 — it has a faster, 2.5GHz quad-core processor, 2GB of RAM, a larger battery with the promised 20 percent better stamina, as well as a new low-power conservation mode to get the most battery possible when you’re running low. The S5 is as fast as you’d expect — Samsung has ensured that its flagship phone is one of the most powerful on the market for a number of years now, and the S5 is no different.

The camera has been upgraded to a 16-megapixel sensor with 4K video capabilities, and it now supports real-time HDR processing for better photos in mixed lighting. It’s now possible to apply Samsung’s unique camera effects after a picture has been taken, so you don’t have to worry about what mode you’re in when shooting pics. Samsung has also greatly simplified the camera interface, and in our brief tests, it was pretty snappy and responsive.

"With the Galaxy S5, Samsung is going back to basics to focus on delivering the capabilities that matter most to our consumers," said JK Shin, president and head of IT & mobile communications division at Samsung. "Galaxy S5 represents an iconic design with essential and useful features to focus on delivering the ultimate smartphone in the market today through people inspired innovation." 

While acknowledging the market murmur about lesser-than-expected sales of Galaxy S4, Shin revealed that Samsung had so far sold over 200 million Galaxy phones. Galaxy S4 was launched in the summer of 2013. It has faced tough competition from the likes of Apple iPhone 5 and 5S, LG G2, HTC One and Sony Xperia Z1. 

Usually, Samsung launches flagship Galaxy phone every year after World Mobile Congress (MWC). But, this year, the company announced Galaxy S5 at the MWC because it wants to replace Galaxy S4 as soon as possible. 

In Galaxy S5, Samsung has introduced several unique features aimed at fitness conscious users in a bid to steal Apple's thunder. It is widely rumoured that the iPhone maker will launch the successor of iPhone 5S with a clutch of health and fitness-related features. 

"With the enhanced S Health 3.0, the Galaxy S5 offers more tools to help people stay fit and well. It provides a comprehensive personal fitness tracker to help users monitor and manage their behaviour, along with additional tools, including a pedometer, diet and exercise records, and a new, built-in heart rate monitor," said a Samsung spokesperson. 

"Galaxy S5 users can further customize their experience with an enriched third party app ecosystem and the ability to pair with next-generation Gear products for real-time fitness coaching," 

Another highlight of the phone is a new iPhone-like fingerprint sensor integrated with the phone's home button. The finger scanner will offer a biometric screen-locking feature and mobile payment experience to consumers. 

The Galaxy S5 sports a 16MP rear camera and a 2.1MP front-facing camera. The rear camera is capable of capturing 4K video at 30 frames per second. Samsung claimed the Galaxy S5 offers the world's fastest auto-focus speed up to 0.3 seconds. 

The smartphone runs on Android 4.4.2 KitKat, the latest version of Google's mobile operating system. It is IP67 certified dust and water-resistant. The back panel of the phone sports a dimpled soft-touch cover, similar to the Nexus 7(2012) tablet. 

In terms of connectivity options, the Galaxy S5 offers Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n and ac, Bluetooth 4.0, USB 3.0, NFC and InfraRed. The phone supports a large number of 4G LTE frequency bands with LTE Category 4 standard. It comes with accelerometer, gyro, proximity, compass, barometer, RGB ambient light, Gesture (IR), and heart rate sensors. 

The phone packs in 2800mAh battery with a claimed standby time of 390 hours and talk time of 21 hours. It will be available in four different colours: charcoal black, shimmery white, electric blue and copper gold.

THE S5 BUILDS ON WHAT WORKED WITH THE S4

Samsung had a successful formula with the Galaxy S4, and for the most part, it looks like it has retained that with the S5. Things are faster, nicer feeling, and easier to use, but it’s still a Samsung smartphone through and through, and will likely be just as successful if not more so than its predecessor.

The Galaxy S5 is scheduled to launch globally on April 11th and will be available on all major US carriers, though Samsung isn’t yet ready to talk pricing. Chances are, the price won’t matter — Samsung has built a very recognizable and successful brand with its Galaxy smartphones, and there’s no reason the S5 won’t continue the company’s success.